… Misery loves company…

Links

The Pit and the Pendulum – complete text from a published collection of tales, The Gift for 1843, available about October 1842, pp. 133-151

The Pit and the Pendulum Study Guide – Fantastic study guide resource. Highly recommended.

INQUISITIO – Scholarly articles, Manuscript and Print resources for the study of Inquisition History, University of Notre Dame. Great resource.

SPANISH INQUISITION- Wikipedia – A nicely detailed article, but of course, be forewarned Wikipedia is not the Encyclopedia Britannica. It’s for reference only, and is best used in conjunction with other, more authoritative sources. I’ve included it here as a great resource of sources, articles, and bibliography.

Did The Spanish Inquisition use the Pit and the Pendulum as a means of torture?
What do you think? Find out more … Click on the link.

“The Myth of the Spanish Inquisition” This 1994 BBC/A&E production exposes the common understanding that “the Inquisition was a vast pogrom of non Catholics as largely the creation of Protestant propaganda” (Catholic Education Resource Center).

Melchor Pérez de Soto: A Book Collector Faces The InquisitionMelchor Pérez de Soto was a navigator, an architect, an astrologer and an avid book collector. He first came to the attention of the Mexican Inquisition in the 1640s, during trials against crypto-Jews.  He was imprisoned, accused of possessing prohibited books and practicing astrology. All of Pérez de Soto’s property was seized at the time of his arrest, including his collection of 1,592 books. This wonderful exhibit of artifacts is reflective of the great disservice the Inquisitorial Tribunals played in cheating the world of many great thinkers of the time. The exhibit was a joint effort by the John Hay Library and the John Carter Brown Library, reconstructing a portion of Melchor Pérez de Soto’s library.

Wikipedia- Edgar Allan Poe – See note above.

Nevermore; Online Exhibit of Poe Memorabilia – A remarkable collection of Poe documents exploring  his life and work through the artifacts of his own hand in his own time. Many of Poe’s unique manuscripts and letters are exhibited online, including scarce first editions, rare examples of original newspaper and magazine issues in which much of his work first appeared, and editions of his most famous poem, “The Raven.” A wonderful resource for both student and teacher.

Edgar Allan Poe Society of Baltimore, Maryland – A comprehensive collection of Poe of e-texts, resources and links. Includes materials and information specific to EA Poe’s time in and around Baltimore.

Enoch Pratt Free Library – The Poe Collection at the Central Library of the Enoch Pratt Free Library in Baltimore, Maryland.  The collection contains numerous significant writings and other documents attributed to Edgar Allan Poe.

The Poe Decoder – An interesting website providing access to Poe’s work online. Dedicated to the intent of providing accurate facts on Edgar Allan Poe, to “once and for all put an end to all the lies and rumors that surround his person.”

The House of Usher – This site emphasizes a popular approach to Poe, providing lists of films &  comic books based on EA Poe’s works.